Relax Unfair Dismissal for 'Lazy' Workers?

lazy_workersA leaked Government report suggests we may soon see a relaxation on increasingly stubborn employment legislation.

The report calls for unproductive workers to lose their right to unfair dismissal - arguing sacking ‘lazy’ workers would boost economic growth.

As it stands, workers can lodge unfair dismissal claims after 12 months in work. Such claims are reported to have cost the UK tax payer £84m in court costs.

The report suggests:

“The rules both make it difficult to prove that someone deserves to be dismissed, and demand a process for doing so which is so lengthy and complex that it is hard to implement.

This makes it too easy for employees to claim they have been unfairly treated and to gain significant compensation."  

Some employers see current legislation as much needed protection for vulnerable employees. Sarah Veale of the TUC, described the proposals as "profoundly unjust".  

"We think it's offensive to huge numbers of hard-working people and actually I would also think it was offensive to the majority of employers who treat their staff fairly".  

This year employment tribunal claims are expected to exceed last year’s 236,000 milestone. With increasing pressure from employees and a slow economy it seems possible that employment legislation may be relaxed.  

Do you have a legal issue regarding employment or require any advice? You can contact Alan Kennedy; our specialist employment Solicitor on 0114 256 4788 or e-mail alan@wosskowbrown.co.uk.

Links:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-15456585
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/jobs/8849420/Give-firms-freedom-to-sack-unproductive-workers-leaked-Downing-Street-report-advises.html

Photo:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3042/2471919561_622daa6c66.jpg

The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.
The contents of this article are intended for general information purposes only and shall not be deemed to be, or constitute legal advice. We cannot accept responsibility for any loss as a result of acts or omissions taken in respect of this article.